Phrases and Clauses

Phrases and Clauses

Phrases

The groups of words like from,  far and nearin the morning and of plastic have a meaning or make sense, but they do not make complete sense. They do not contain a finite verb and have no subject or predicates. Such a group cannot make complete sense alone but can have meaning only through its relation to some other part of the sentence in which it stand. Such a group of words is called a Phrase.A phrase acts as a noun, an adjective, an adverb or a preposition in a sentence Accordingly phrases are classified as;
1. Noun Phrase
2. Adjective Phrase
3. Adverb Phrase
4. Prepositional Phrase
Examples of phrase are:
1. To win the race my son’s dream.            (Noun phrase)
2. The whole structure is made of steel.      (Adjective phrase)
3. Try Not to speak in rude manner.            (Adverb phrase)
4 He got the job by means of his approach.  (Prepositional phrase)

Clauses

In each group of words (that she is happy, when the morning came, when it is fine), there is a subject and a verb of its own. Such a group of words is called a Clause. A Clause is group of words that forms a part of a larger sentence and has a subject and predicate of its own.
Read the following sentences:
1. Rama says that she is happy.
2. He left us when the morning came.
3. We shall leave when it is fine.

Kinds of Clause

Clauses are of three kinds: Noun Clause, Adjective Clause and Adverb Clause.

1. Noun Clause

Observe the following sentences:
1. He expected to win the race.
2. He expected that he would win the race. The first group of words, to win the race, does not contain a subject and predicate of its own. It is therefore, a phrase. It is the object of the verb expected. Hence, it is a noun phrase.
The second group of words, that he will win the race contains a subject (he) and a predicate (will win the race). It is, therefore, a clause. This clause is the object of the verb expected, so it does the work as a noun. It is, therefore, called a Noun Clause.

2. Adjective Clause

Observe the following sentences:
1. A man of courage is respected everywhere.
2. A man who is courageous is respected everywhere.
The first group of words (of courage) describes the noun (man). It tells us what kind of a man is respected. It qualifies the noun ‘man’, i.e. does the work of an adjective, but does not have complete meaning. It is therefore, an adjective phrase.
The second group of words (who is courageous) also describes the noun (man) and so does the work as an adjective. But, since it contains a subject (man) and a predicate (is courageous) of its own, it is called an Adjective Clause.

3. Adverb Clause

Observe the following sentences:
1. He went in the morning.
2. He went when the morning came.
Both the highlighted groups of words, in sentences 1 and 2, do the work of an adverb, as they show ‘when he went’. But, in Sentence 1, the group of words (in the morning) is a phrases it does not contain a finite verb and is not complete in itself. So it is an adverb phrase.
In Sentence 2, the group of words (when the morning came) is a clause for it has a subject (the morning) and a verb(came) of its own. Since it does the work of an adverb, it is called an Adverb Clause.

Disclaimer

Due care has been taken to ensure that the information provided in this content is correct. However, Preprise bear no responsibility for any damage resulting from any inadvertent omission or inaccuracy in the content. Help us to improve Preprise.com: Contact us.